Trash talker

24.writer.witch baby.

i-raskolnikov:

Fuggin’ autoharp badassery.

Marry me, Cory McAbee/ someone help me make a skinned rabbit t shirt

faggotdemon:

wishin on the same star

Ezra is such a mega babe

faggotdemon:

wishin on the same star

Ezra is such a mega babe

You know the good years when you’re in them?

Because there’s this feeling, you might notice it sometimes, this feeling like life has slipped through your fingers. Like the future is behind you, like it’s always been behind you. 

(Source: widespindriftgaze, via south-gothic)

form-and-void:

CRUELEST ANIMAL - the complete TRUE DETECTIVE soundtrack - Every song from every episode of the first season. The soundtrack is made up mostly of country, folk, and blues, with heavy Southern gothic influences and a dark, lonely sense of moodiness.
OpeningFar From Any Road - The Handsome FamilyEpisode I: The Long Bright DarkRocks and Gravel - Bob DylanSign Of The Judgement - The McIntosh County ShoutersYoung Dead Men - The Black AngelsEpisode II: Seeing ThingsUnfriendly Woman - John Lee HookerOne Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer - John Lee HookerThe Train Song - Vashti BunyanYou Better Run To The City Of Refuge - Reverend CJ Johnson and FamilyMeet Me In The Alleyway - Steve EarleIf I Live Or Die - Cuff The DukeKingdom Of Heaven - 13th Floor ElevatorsEpisode III: The Locked RoomStand By Me - The Staple SingersDoes My Ring Burn Your Finger - Buddy MillerI’m a One Woman Man - Johnny HortonEvangeline Special - Jo-El SonnierThe Heart That You Own - Jo-El SonnierEpisode IV: Who Goes ThereA History of Bad Men - MelvinsAmerican Life - PrimusHoly Mountain - SleepClan In da Front - Wu-Tang ClanHoney Bee - GrindermanAre you alright? - Lucinda WilliamsIllegal Business - Boogie Down ProductionsBring It to Jerome - Bo DiddleyRainin’ in My Heart - Slim HarpoSur Le Borde de L’Eau - Blind Uncle GaspardEpisode V: The Secret Fate Of All LifeEli - Bosnian RainbowsCasey’s Last Ride - Kris KristoffersonTired of Waiting for You - The KinksEpisode VI: Haunted HousesWaymore’s Blues - Waylon JenningsToo Many at ears In My Eyes - Ike & Tina TurnerEvery Man Needs a Companion - Father John MistyCore Chant - Meredith MonkVariations Goldberg, BWV 988: Aria - Glenn GouldThe Good Book - Emmylou HarrisLes Champs Élysée - Bobby CharlesEpisode VII: After You’re GoneDid She Jump Or Was She Pushed - Richard and Linda ThompsonLungs - Townes Van ZandtFault Line - Black Rebel Motorcycle ClubFloating Bridge - Gregg AllmanTrance Figure - School of Seven BellsAngel of the Morning - Juice NewtonRed Light - Vincent and Mr. GreenEpisode VIII: Form And VoidThe Angry River - The Hat, Father John Misty, & S.I. Istwa

form-and-void:

CRUELEST ANIMAL - the complete TRUE DETECTIVE soundtrack - Every song from every episode of the first season. The soundtrack is made up mostly of country, folk, and blues, with heavy Southern gothic influences and a dark, lonely sense of moodiness.

Opening
Far From Any Road - The Handsome Family
Episode I: The Long Bright Dark
Rocks and Gravel - Bob Dylan
Sign Of The Judgement - The McIntosh County Shouters
Young Dead Men - The Black Angels
Episode II: Seeing Things
Unfriendly Woman - John Lee Hooker
One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer - John Lee Hooker
The Train Song - Vashti Bunyan
You Better Run To The City Of Refuge - Reverend CJ Johnson and Family
Meet Me In The Alleyway - Steve Earle
If I Live Or Die - Cuff The Duke
Kingdom Of Heaven - 13th Floor Elevators
Episode III: The Locked Room
Stand By Me - The Staple Singers
Does My Ring Burn Your Finger - Buddy Miller
I’m a One Woman Man - Johnny Horton
Evangeline Special - Jo-El Sonnier
The Heart That You Own - Jo-El Sonnier
Episode IV: Who Goes There
A History of Bad Men - Melvins
American Life - Primus
Holy Mountain - Sleep
Clan In da Front - Wu-Tang Clan
Honey Bee - Grinderman
Are you alright? - Lucinda Williams
Illegal Business - Boogie Down Productions
Bring It to Jerome - Bo Diddley
Rainin’ in My Heart - Slim Harpo
Sur Le Borde de L’Eau - Blind Uncle Gaspard
Episode V: The Secret Fate Of All Life
Eli - Bosnian Rainbows
Casey’s Last Ride - Kris Kristofferson
Tired of Waiting for You - The Kinks
Episode VI: Haunted Houses
Waymore’s Blues - Waylon Jennings
Too Many at ears In My Eyes - Ike & Tina Turner
Every Man Needs a Companion - Father John Misty
Core Chant - Meredith Monk
Variations Goldberg, BWV 988: Aria - Glenn Gould
The Good Book - Emmylou Harris
Les Champs Élysée - Bobby Charles
Episode VII: After You’re Gone
Did She Jump Or Was She Pushed - Richard and Linda Thompson
Lungs - Townes Van Zandt
Fault Line - Black Rebel Motorcycle Club
Floating Bridge - Gregg Allman
Trance Figure - School of Seven Bells
Angel of the Morning - Juice Newton
Red Light - Vincent and Mr. Green
Episode VIII: Form And Void
The Angry River - The Hat, Father John Misty, & S.I. Istwa

(via south-gothic)

Geeshie Wiley

—Last Kind Words Blues

solitaryshadowdancer:

"Last Kind Words Blues" — Geeshie Wiley

Thank God for the OA and New York Times getting everyone talking about Geeshie

Cob house building a go, mother fuckers

karmictard:

I graduate college today at 3pm.

Happy Good Friday!

Already out of college but GOOD FRIDAY GOOD FRIDAY GOOD FRIDAY!

the-final-sentence:

the-final-sentence:

March 6 - Gabriel García Márquez
Bio:  Born on March 6, 1928, writer Gabriel García Márquez grew up listening to family tales. After college, he became a journalist. His work introduced readers to magical realism, which combines fact and fantasy. His novels Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) and El amor en los tiempos del cólera (Love in the Time of Cholera) have drawn worldwide audiences. He won a Nobel Prize in 1982. [2]
Anecdotes:
The highly political Marquez has long been a friend of Cuban president Fidel Castro. [3]
He claims that he wrote the book “One Hundred Years of Solitude” barricaded in his study in Mexico, after receiving a vision. One day, while he and his wife and children were in their car driving to Acapulco, he saw that he “had to tell [his] story the way his grandmother used to tell hers, and that [he] was to start from that afternoon in which a father took his child to discover ice.” He made an abrupt U-turn on the highway, the car never made it to Acapulco, and he locked himself in his study. Fifteen months later, he emerged with the manuscript, only to meet his wife holding a stack of bills. They traded papers, and she put the manuscript in the mail to his publisher. [4]
He has a yellow rose or tulip on his writing desk each day. [5]
When he was diagnosed with lymphatic cancer, he gamely declared to the world that the disease was an “enormous stroke of luck” because it finally forced him to write his memoirs. [6]
Final sentences:






‘Forever,’ he said.

from Love in the Time of Cholera (translated by Edith Grossman)











[He stumbled on the last step, but he got up at once. “He even took care to brush off the dirt that was stuck to his guts,” my Aunt Wene told me.] Then he went into his house through the back door that had been open since six and fell on his face in the kitchen.

from Chronicle of a Death Foretold











[And she, with a sad smile—which was already a smile of surrender to the impossible, the unreachable—said: “Yet you won’t remember anything during the day.” And she put her hands back over the lamp, her features darkened by a bitter cloud.] “You’re the only man who doesn’t remember anything of what he’s dreamed after he wakes up.

from Eyes of a Blue Dog (short story)

Only then did she understand that three thousand years had passed since the day she had had a desire to eat the first orange.

from Eva is Inside Her Cat (short story)

Before reaching the final line, however, he had already understood that he would never leave that room, for it was foreseen that the city of mirrors (or mirages) would be wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men at the precise moment when Aureliano Babilonia would finish deciphering the parchments, and that everything written on them was unrepeatable since time immemorial and forever more, because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth.

from One Hundred Years of Solitude





Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

No no no no no no no

the-final-sentence:

the-final-sentence:

March 6 - Gabriel García Márquez

Bio:  Born on March 6, 1928, writer Gabriel García Márquez grew up listening to family tales. After college, he became a journalist. His work introduced readers to magical realism, which combines fact and fantasy. His novels Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) and El amor en los tiempos del cólera (Love in the Time of Cholera) have drawn worldwide audiences. He won a Nobel Prize in 1982. [2]

Anecdotes:

  • The highly political Marquez has long been a friend of Cuban president Fidel Castro. [3]
  • He claims that he wrote the book “One Hundred Years of Solitude” barricaded in his study in Mexico, after receiving a vision. One day, while he and his wife and children were in their car driving to Acapulco, he saw that he “had to tell [his] story the way his grandmother used to tell hers, and that [he] was to start from that afternoon in which a father took his child to discover ice.” He made an abrupt U-turn on the highway, the car never made it to Acapulco, and he locked himself in his study. Fifteen months later, he emerged with the manuscript, only to meet his wife holding a stack of bills. They traded papers, and she put the manuscript in the mail to his publisher. [4]
  • He has a yellow rose or tulip on his writing desk each day. [5]
  • When he was diagnosed with lymphatic cancer, he gamely declared to the world that the disease was an “enormous stroke of luck” because it finally forced him to write his memoirs. [6]

Final sentences:

‘Forever,’ he said.

from Love in the Time of Cholera (translated by Edith Grossman)

[He stumbled on the last step, but he got up at once. “He even took care to brush off the dirt that was stuck to his guts,” my Aunt Wene told me.] Then he went into his house through the back door that had been open since six and fell on his face in the kitchen.

from Chronicle of a Death Foretold

[And she, with a sad smile—which was already a smile of surrender to the impossible, the unreachable—said: “Yet you won’t remember anything during the day.” And she put her hands back over the lamp, her features darkened by a bitter cloud.] “You’re the only man who doesn’t remember anything of what he’s dreamed after he wakes up.

from Eyes of a Blue Dog (short story)

Only then did she understand that three thousand years had passed since the day she had had a desire to eat the first orange.

from Eva is Inside Her Cat (short story)

Before reaching the final line, however, he had already understood that he would never leave that room, for it was foreseen that the city of mirrors (or mirages) would be wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men at the precise moment when Aureliano Babilonia would finish deciphering the parchments, and that everything written on them was unrepeatable since time immemorial and forever more, because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth.

from One Hundred Years of Solitude

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

No no no no no no no